Until the changes, Latin was widely always used to celebrate the Mass. One reason for having the Mass in Latin in the first place was to have it in a language that everyone speaks or understood, and everyone used to understand the Latin used in Mass. If the Mass changes back to Latin across the boards, then you might go out and learn Latin again so that you could understand the Mass. Chill, it is possible you understand the Mass no matter what language it’s in. But during a Latin Mass, in an attempt to respond to the priest, have you ever been disturbed by the words from that other person close by? and have you stolen a glance at his or her lips to say, “Whoo!”. Well, I have experienced that a couple of times. It’s embarrassing that they seem lost with the words as they try to fumble. But what could they do than play along so it wouldn’t seem to other people who are close by that they are actually lost!

It’s relieving to have the Mass in the language of the crowd so that any newcomer off the streets can listen and understand, but if it changes back, It’s still cool, and I guess some others would be okay with it too.  In recent times, the Latin Mass is celebrated at every first sunday of the month, and most Celebrants usually mix it up with the language understood mostly by the people. I would prefer that it’s not used often unless everyone takes up Latin again. But hardly anyone even remembers phone numbers anymore because there is a phone book on your cell phone. So, I wonder.

The reason the Vatican made these changes was that the Church realized that hardly anyone was speaking Latin anymore, except for a few moldy perennial students. So you get the point? It’s not okay if the people gathered don’t all understand that common language.

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